15th October 2017

11th October 2017

More on James Comey Testimony…

10th March 2017

  • Libya topples back into civil war as rival sides battle for control of oil terminals.
  • UK-funded refugee camps in Libya are indefinitely detaining asylum-seekers.
  • Kenyan security forces, the recipients of a fair amount of US counterterrorism funding, are accused of torture, executions, and disappearances.
  • Besieged: A 360º experience in Sudan’s Nuba mountains.”
  • Japan ends its five year peacekeeping mission in South Sudan.
  • War consumes South Sudan.
  • Amid famine, the South Sudanese government signaled that it will increase the cost of work permits for foreign aid workers.
  • Israel passed a law banning those supporting a boycott of the country from entering.
  • A former Guantánamo inmate was killed in a US airstrike in Yemen.
  • The Trump administration looks to resume Saudi arms sales.
  • The UN urges Turkey to investigate killings in the southeast.
  • Emin Ozmen’s photos of the Syrian refugee experience in Turkey.
  • The Syrian war enters its seventh year, with millions internally displaced and millions more in need of humanitarian aid.
  • The US puts hundreds of Marines on the ground in the fight for Raqqa, adding to the international power struggle in the conflict.
  • US forces headed to Manbij to disrupt fighting between rival US-allied forces.
  • Syrian children are suffering toxic stress, showing a range of symptoms as a result of their constant, lifelong exposure to violence and fear.
  • Warlords and armed militias are taking control inside Assad’s territory.
  • After the second Islamic State occupation, Palmyra remains majestic despite the devastation.
  • The Islamic State leaves Mosul’s antiquities museum in ruins.
  • Iraqi troops find Assyrian treasures in the Islamic State’s network of tunnels beneath Mosul.
  • As Iraqi security forces advance through Mosul, the Islamic State deploys vicious and rapidly evolving counterattacks.
  • Bahrain has moved to ban the main opposition party and to shift a number of civilian cases to a military court.
  • Gunmen dressed as medics killed dozens in an attack on Kabul’s main military hospital.
  • NPR interviews Afghanistan’s ambassador to Washington, Hamdullah Mohib.
  • The impossible job of Afghanistan’s attorney general.
  • Putting a human face on the cost of terror in Kabul.
  • The head of US Central Command wants more troops for Afghanistan.
  • A dangerous new development in Myanmar: the formation of the first Rohingya insurgent group in decades.
  • The International Court of Justice declined to reopen the genocide case against Serbia.
  • History repeats itself in Ukraine.
  • Two weeks after being released from prison, police detained Putin critic and activist Ildar Dadin.
  • German lawmakers approved broadened security measures, including expanded video surveillance.
  • The US Army is scouting two facilities in northern Germany as potential spots for bases.
  • Gen. Paul Selva, the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, offered the first public confirmation that Russia had deployed a cruise missile in violation of an arms treaty.
  • A man who spent years lobbying the Pentagon on behalf of Palantir has taken a job as special assistant to Secretary of Defense James Mattis.
  • Attorney General Sessions has said he would adviseTrump to place captured terror suspects in Guantánamo.
  • WikiLeaks published a leak of CIA documents largely on hacking and surveillance.
  • After reporting that US Marines shared nude photographs of female Marines on Facebook, the scandal has widened to other branches of service.

3rd March 2017

  • Former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak was acquittedby Egypt’s top appeals court in the deaths of protesters in 2011.
  • Three extremist groups in Mali merged and pledged allegiance to Al Qaeda.
  • Burundi’s president, Pierre Nkurunziza, is waging war on an independent media, using an intimidation and disinformation campaign to protect himself and stoke ethnic tensions.
  • Nigerians report massacres carried out, not by Boko Haram, but by the military they believed was there to help them.
  • Gambians seek justice for those disappeared under Jammeh’s rule.
  • Politicized humanitarian aid exacerbates and fuels South Sudan’s conflict.
  • Is Somalia ready for the withdrawal of AMISOM?
  • China and the US become wary neighbors in east Africa.
  • Opposition journalists, activists, and members of parliament have been swept up in a wave of arrests in Turkey preceding a referendum that would grant President Erdoğan wide-ranging power.
  • Israel has been detaining Palestinians under a 2002 law that strips them of due process rights.
  • Upcoming Palestinian municipal elections will be held in the occupied West Bank, but not in Gaza, where Hamas reportedly refuses to hold elections.
  • A snapshot of life in rural, famine-burdened Yemen.
  • Pro-government Syrian forces recaptured Palmyra from the Islamic State.
  • Rival groups race for control of Raqqa.
  • Russia bombed US-backed Syrian fighters, apparently by mistake.
  • The Syrian state’s victims and their families are pursuing justice through European courts.
  • A UN report states that the Assad government carried outa number of war crimes in Aleppo in 2016, including chlorine attacks.
  • The Islamic State used a massive sinkhole outside of Mosul as a site of executions and body dumps; thousands of bodies are believed to be there, though the group has filled it in and booby-trapped it.
  • Rival Kurdish group’s clash in Iraq’s Sinjar region.
  • In the final weeks of Obama’s presidency, negotiations took place with Iran for the release of two American prisoners, collapsing days before Trump’s inauguration.
  • An uptick in terrorism in Pakistan is straining its relationship with Afghanistan.
  • Pakistan’s cabinet approved a planned reform package for the tribal areas, including the extension of basic constitutional rights and the ability to vote to those citizens.
  • Philippines police falsify evidence in order justify unlawful killings in the country’s ongoing drug war.
  • A Russian activist recounts his experiences of torture after being imprisoned under the country’s new anti-protest laws.
  • In Syria and Ukraine, Russia positions itself as a solution to problems it created.
  • Blockaders in Ukraine aim to cut off rail traffic from the east.
  • Amid worries about Russian aggression, Sweden reintroduces military conscription.
  • New guidance from the British Home Office callously says that gay Afghan asylum seekers can be deportedback home, where homosexuality is illegal, and pretend to be straight.
  • German firms turn to the US and UK when laws in Germany block them from exporting weapons to conflict-affected countries.
  • Leaked court documents show evidence that the 2016 assassination of Honduran environmental activist Berta Cáceres was an extrajudicial killing carried out by military intelligence specialists linked to the country’s US–trained special forces.
  • Trump’s latest moves to publish lists of crimes committed by undocumented immigrants is drawing comparison to Hitler’s lists of crimes committed by Jews.
  • “Money will not fix what ails our military. We don’t have a supply problem, we have a demand problem created by poor strategy.”
  • In the last days of the Obama administration, officials rushed to preserve evidence of Russian hacking and Trump campaign links to Russia.
  • Two years ago, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, the new national security advisor, was investigated by the Army and admonished for allowing two lieutenants to attend Ranger School even though they were under criminal investigation for sexual assault.